SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

Select from the manuscript list below.

 

Bass, Rick
Papers, 1958-2001 and undated
78 boxes and 1 tube (83 linear feet)

    The collection is composed mostly of the literary works and research materials of Rick Bass.  Literary works are in original manuscripts, galleys, proofs, and other revised draft copies.  Some materials are business correspondence and scrapbook materials.  The correspondence reflects Bass’ activities with literary agents, book and magazine publishers, and conferences he attended.  Some correspondence is fan mail.  The holograph notebooks, conservation papers, and environmental reports make up the research materials gathered by Rick Bass.  The holograph notebooks are original hand notes of Bass’ stories and books.  About six boxes have files concerning his participation with the Yaak Valley Forest Council.  Thirteen boxes are geological records of oil and gas induction logs and leases from Alabama and Mississippi petroleum sites gathered by Rick Bass while working as a petroleum geologist. For further details, click here:  Bass.
   Rick Bass is a natural history writer and the author of numerous short story anthologies and books, both fiction and non-fiction.  His works include Platte River, The Ninemile Wolves, Oil Notes, The Watch, Where the Sea Used to Be, and The Sky, The Stars, and The Wilderness.  Rick Bass worked as a petroleum geologist in the southeast during the 1980s before changing his career to a writer.

Boeer/Wolf Families
Papers, 1837-1972 and undated
3 boxes (3 linear feet)

    Collection consists of mostly correspondence to and from family members, relatives, and friends of relatives of the Boeer and Wolf Families. The correspondence is mostly in the German language. The bulk of the correspondence concentrate on letters sent to Maria Boeer, the grandmother of Mina Wolf Lamb and Ilse Wolf. It also includes Maria Boeer’s correspondence with German editors as she was an avid writer herself. Also contains a few of Ilse Wolf’s files on the Home Economics Department at Oklahoma State University and Texas Tech University. Also contains files on literary productions, printed materials, and scrapbook material.  For further details, click here:  Boeer/Wolf.
    The collection was created by two families the Wolf and Boeer Families who imigrated during the mid to late 19th Century from Germany to Texas. Karl Wolf’s parents had moved to Texas during the 1890’s. Karl Wolf became involved with the "Free Thinkers" Club a social organization that supported freedom, democracy, and nationalism. He eventually married Louisa Boeer, daughter of Maria Wolf Boeer. After moving from the Houston area, Karl’s family settled in Old Glory, Texas where they raised two daughters, Mina and Ilse Wolf. Mina and Ilse both graduated from Texas Technological College in 1932. They each have master’s and doctoral degrees from other universities. Indirectly, Mina and Ilse Wolf are related to Thomas A. Hickey the Texas socialist and publisher of The Rebel. Their aunt, Clara, the daughter of Maria Wolf Boeer and sister of Louisa married Hickey in the very early 1900’s. Maria Boeer’s correspondence describes her association with the socialist movement as well as association with German writers from abroad. The family heritage of the Boeer and Wolf Families are detailed from their writing to and from their relatives and friends abroad and in the United States.

Boyle, Kay
Papers, 1910-1992
6 boxes

    Collection of correspondence, leaflets, date books, speeches, poems, short stories, essays, reviews, contracts, working notes, and articles concerning the life of Kay Boyle.  For further details, click here:  KBoyle.

British American Oil Treaty
Records, 1944
2 boxes (2 linear feet)

    The collection consists of the correspondence sent to the Fight For Free Enterprise in San Antonio, Texas, in protest of the possible British – American Oil Treaty.  This group was very active in protesting the treaty.  Some give their support for rejecting the treaty.  There are over 200 mail-ins from a newspaper where the group published an ad that had a form to fill out, clip, and send in to add their name to the petition.   Most of the correspondence is from Texas residents, however, there are letters, post cards, and clip outs from many other states.   Correspondence contains some anti-war and anti-Roosevelt remarks.  Quite a few letters from car dealerships, who obviously had a stake.
    On August 8, 1944 an unperfected agreement was signed, called the Anglo-American Oil Treaty, or The British American Oil Treaty.  It was sent to the United States Senate on August 24, 1944 to be advised upon and signed.  It was ultimately rejected and resubmitted after rewording on September 17, 1945.  Again it was rejected, reworded and resent on July 5, 1952.  On October 28, 1944 Bill Hopkins gave a radio report that detailed the possible British – American Oil Treaty.  A group called the Fight For Free Enterprise, located in San Antonio, Texas, organized a petition that demanded that the United Stated not participate in such a treaty.  The public responded by sending letters, postcards, and a newspaper coupons in which they could protest the treaty.

Crawford, Max
Papers, 1938-2000 and undated
10 boxes (9.3 linear ft.)

    Collection Collection of literary production in the form of written manuscripts, holographs, and galleys, research materials and hand notes, and literary correspondence with his publishers. Literary records include daily compile activities, expenditures, and correspondence while Mr. Crawford lived in France and Livingston, Montana and other places.  For further details, click here:  MCrawford.
    Max Crawford Max Crawford is a writer born and raised around Mount Blanco, Texas near the vicinity of Floyd County, Motley County and Crosby County, Texas along the Blanco Canyon. His works include "Lords of the Plain", "The Backslider", "Eastertown", "Wamba", "The Red and The White", "Bad Communist", and numerous poems. He lived in France during the 1980s-1990s before moving to Livingston, Montana.

Duncan, David James
Papers, 1959-2002 and undated
9 boxes (7.9 linear feet)

    The collection includes business and fan correspondence, manuscripts to published books and articles, reviews, some artifacts, miscellaneous publications, and lecture notes concerning David James Duncanís writing career.  David James Duncan is a writer whose works include My Story as Told by Water, The Brothers K, The River Why, and River Teeth.  Duncan is a lifelong resident of Oregon.  For further details, click here:  Duncan.

Hemenway Family
Papers, 1870-1935
2 boxes (2 linear feet)

    The collection contains letters passed between Martha Hemenway, her children, friends, and family from 1870-1935.  Most of the collection is correspondence between Martha and Susan, and Martha and Fanny.  These letters contain aspects of daily life such as family events, death and illness, town gossip, sewing, church meetings, and work.  Some letters contain flower and fabric samples, advertisements, and programs.  Many letters, especially by Susie, Fannie, and their mother, talk about the newly created PEO organization.  This organization not only served a social tool, but was created as a tool to support women who wanted to continue to higher education.
   Martha Hemenway was born around 1840 and her parents were John Haney, Sr. and Fanny Toll Hemenway of Iowa.  They settled in the most eastern corner of Iowa on the Mississippi.  Martha married Samuel W. Hemenway on September 30, 1866.  They had six children.

Kittredge, William
Papers, 1954-2000 and undated
46 boxes (46 linear feet)

    The collection has a variety of materials detailing the literary works of William Kittredge.  They include manuscripts of draft copies, published and unpublished works, short stories, final copies, revisions, research materials to his works, photocopied news clippings, business and literary correspondence, lecture and class notes, reviews, and computer disks.   Some of his literary works include “A River Runs Through It,” “Sixty Million Buffalo,” “Hole in the Sky,” and “Nature of Generosity.”  Also include anthologies such as “Last Best Place” and “West of Your Town.”  For further details, click here:  WKittredge.
   The Kittredge Papers spans most of his career as a writer.  His short fictions have appeared in two volumes of and his nonfiction which include essays and a memoir have appeared in several volumes.  His awards are numerous:  National Governor’s Award for the Arts, the PEN West Award, and the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Charles Frankle Prize for service to the humanities, Neil Simon Award from American Playhouse.  His book, A River Runs Through It, became a film which he co-produced.  He retired in 1997 after teaching creative writing at the University of Montana.

Lopez, Barry
Papers, 1964-2001 and undated
76 boxes and 2 tubes (67 linear feet)

    The collection contains correspondence, research materials, manuscripts, speaking engagement files, guest teaching files, book reviews, college class work, and magazines.  Most of the materials concentrate on Lopez’s research for Arctic Dreams, Of Wolves and Men, Apologia, Crow and Weasel, and other writings.  The guest teaching files deal with his time at Notre Dame and Eastern Washington University.For further details, click here:  BLopez
   Barry Lopez is a writer of both fictional short stories and non-fiction works concerning natural history.  His is well known for his books Arctic Dreams and Of Wolves and Men.  His awards are numerous:  American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, Guggenheim Fellowship, a Lannan Foundation Award, John Burroughs Medal for Of Wolves and Men, and National Book Award for Arctic Dreams.  Lopez was raised in California and New York City and currently lives in Oregon.

McKibben, Bill
Papers, 1971-2001 and undated
50 boxes (50 linear feet)

   The collection includes mostly research materials for Bill McKibben's works such as The End of Nature, Hope, Human and Wild, and     The Age of Missing Information.  Several boxes include his  research for the over 400 articles written for “The Talk of the Town” column as featured in The New Yorker magazine.  Also includes files of business correspondence, Heck Lectures, miscellaneous environmental research, Crane Mountain Landfill (Johnsburg, New York), “Here and Now” magazine business venture (1987). For further details, click here McKibben
   Bill McKibben born on December 8, 1960 is a freelance writer whose works include The End of Nature, Hope, Human and Wild, and The Age of Missing Information.  His writings concern the impact of society and culture on the global environment.  Bill earned his Bachelors degree from Harvard College in 1982.  He currently lives in the Adirondacks in New York State with his family.  Mr. McKibben wrote over 400 articles for the “Talk of the Town” column featured in The New Yorker magazine during the 1980s.  His honors include Lyndhurst Fellow (1988-1991), Honorary Doctorate from Lebanon Valley College (1991), and Guggenheim Fellowship (1993).

Peacock, Doug
Papers, 1950-2000
24 boxes (24 linear feet)

    This collection has research materials, personal and business correspondence, reviews, publications, engagement calendars, written articles, pocket size journals, Edward Abbey material, manuscript and galleys and field notes on Doug Peacock’s studies on grizzly bears.  Most notable is the Grizzly Years manuscript.  For further details, click here:  DPeacock.
   Doug Peacock is a grizzly bear and bison expert, author, wild-lands activist, and filmmaker.  He has appeared on television shows such as The Today Show, Good Morning America, and The American Sportsman as an expert on the subject.  He is also a veteran of the Vietnam War.  The films from this collection represent outtakes of grizzly bears filmed in the wild and      Peacock’s War.

Quammen, David
Papers, 1856-1999 and undated
35 boxes (35 linear feet)

   The collection has a variety of materials detailing the literary works of David Quammen.   They include manuscripts of draft copies, published and unpublished works, short stories, final copies, revisions, research materials to his works, photocopied news clippings, business and literary correspondence, reviews, audio and video recordings.  Some of his literary works include “The Song of the Dodo”, “The Soul of Victor Tronko”, “Natural Acts” research and magazine features.  Most of the materials concentrate on his research for “Song of the Dodo”.  For further details, click here:  DQuammen.
   The Quammen Papers spans most of his career as a contemporary “science” and “travel” writer.  He has written a column for Outside magazine for fifteen years.  One of his books is The Song of the Dodo which is based on the impact of humans to plant and animal wildlife.  He has received a Lannan Foundation Fellowship.  Awards include the National Magazine Award, and the New York Public Library’s Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism.

Rogers, Pattiann
Papers, 1960-1999 and undated
25 boxes (25 linear feet)

    The collection has a variety of materials detailing the literary works of Pattiann Rogers.  They include manuscripts of draft copies, published and unpublished works, short stories, final copies, revisions, research materials to her works, photocopied news clippings, workshop and conference materials, business and literary correspondence, teaching materials, reviews, audio and video recordings, and computer disks.  Some of her literary works include “Splitting and Binding,” “The Tattooed Lady in the Garden,” “Legendary Performance,” “Firekeeper,” “A Covenant of Seasons,” “Dream of Marsh Wren,”and “Geocentric.”   For further details, click here:  PRogers.
   The Rogers Papers spans most of her career as a poet.  She has published nine books of poetry and several chapbooks including recent works Dreams of the Marsh Wren (1999), Eating Bread and Honey (1997), The Expectations of Light, Splitting and Binding (1988), Geocentric (1993), and Firekeeper (1994).  She has received two National Endowment of the Arts grants, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Lannan Poetry Fellowship.  Awards include Tietjens Prize, the Hokin Prize, the Roethke Prize, and four Pushcart Prizes.

Rogers, Pattiann
Papers, 1977-2000
2 boxes (2 linear feet)

    The collection is composed mostly of correspondence with literary agents and academic professionals between the years 1998-2000.   Some of the correspondence comes from fans and friends.  A few files include early poems and essays from Rogers’ college years, drafts of poems and essays from works written in 2000, an unpublished interview by Bill Yake, and a file of reviews and curriculum vitae.For further details, click here PRogers
   Pattiann Rogers is an American poet and essayist.  She has published nine books of poetry and several chapbooks including recent works Dreams of the Marsh Wren (1999), Eating Bread and Honey (1997), The Expectations of Light, Splitting and Binding (1988), Geocentric (1993), and Firekeeper (1994).   She has received two National Endowment of the Arts grants, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Lannan Poetry Fellowship.  Awards include Tietjens Prize, the Hokin Prize, the Roethke Prize, and four Pushcart Prizes.

Smith, Annick
Papers, 1940-2000
20 boxes (20 linear feet)

   The collection has a variety of materials pertaining to the literary and film works of Annick Smith.  They include manuscripts of draft copies of published works, short stories and poems, final copies, revisions, research materials to her works, film proposals, photocopied news clippings, business and literary correspondence, reviews, “Heartland” and “A River Runs Through It” film work, and audio recordings.  Some of the works include “The Balance of Fishes,” “Big Bluestem:  Journey into the Tall Grass,” “Homestead.”   For further details, click here:  ASmith.
   Annick Smith is a writer and filmmaker of the natural history genre.  Born in Paris, France 1936, she grew up in Chicago, Illinois.  Since 1964, she has lived in Montana raising her family.  After her college years she became a teacher at a high school and book editor for the University of Washington Press and The Montana Business Quarterly.   She is known for her film credits, which include “Heartland,” co-producer of Robert Redford’s adaptation of “A River Runs Through It,” and associate producer of “Peacock’s War.”   She is a founding board member of the Sundance Film Institute in Utah.  In Missoula, she founded the Hellgate Writers, a literary center.  She has participated in numerous workshops and conferences.  Smith and William Kittredge edited The Last Best Place, a best selling Montana anthology.  In addition to her books Homestead and Big Bluestem, her numerous articles, poems, and stories have appeared in Audubon, Outside, National Geographic Traveler, Story and other magazines and journals.

Strout, Mary Graves
Collection, 1870-1933 and undated
1 box (1 linear foot)

    Collection of assorted theatre programs and plays and news clippings to entertainment events all arranged chronological.  The events were sponsored by various groups from cities through out the United States.  Mary Graves Strout was an English professor at Texas Technological College who specialized in folklore and tales.  She traveled in the U. S. and attended various theatrical plays for entertainment.