Word, Dr Max J 1997-08-05

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Dr. Max Word reminisces about his experiences in medicine. He was one of Lubbock’s first radiologists, arriving in Lubbock in 1972.

General Interview Information

Interviewee Name: Dr. Max J. Word

Additional Parties Recorded: None

Date: August 05, 1997

Location: Lubbock, Texas

Interviewer: Lori Lawson

Length: 2 hours 50 minutes


Abstract

Tape 1, Side 1: Max Word, background, Born: Ozona, Texas (December 28, 1929), Father, Farmer, Concho County, Texas, Married (1926), Work, Freight service, farming, ranching, School in Ozona, College—North Texas Agricultural College (now University of Texas, Arlington), Pre-med, Influence of coach ‘Clinto’ Holmes, Texas A & M Veterinarian School, Graduated (1952), Veterinary practice (c. 1950s), Memphis, Tennessee, Korean War service, Duty with medical doctors, Ranch veterinarian at ‘Punk’ McNatt Ranch, Teaching and pre-med at Texas A & M, Mother and father’s school background, Medical school, Married Eunice Rose Barge in Chicago, Internship, Parkland Hospital (Dallas, Texas), University of Oklahoma Medical School, Practice of medicine in Colorado, Radiology training at Parkland Hospital, Move to Lubbock (1972), Impressions of weather.

Tape 1, Side 2: Diagnostic radiology, Background, Technical aspects, Usefulness in treatment, Specialization, Max Word (again), Managing partner, Diagnostic Radiology Associates, West Texas Hospital, Work with Drs. Howard Hancock and Barry, Williams, Methodist Hospital staff, First radiologist for Texas Tech Medical School (1974), Taught at Tech Medical School, Early interest in medicine, Treating ranch animals, Radiologist training, Radiologist work, Night hours, Lubbock group, Lubbock as a regional medical center, Tech Medical School influence, Max Word (again), Post medical school matching process, State licensing, Medical schools’ reputations, Parkland Hospital (again), Medical schools, Importance of residency, Radiology changes since 1972, ‘Technological revolution’, Ultrasound, Beatles engineering company: EMI’s role.

Tape 2, Side 1: Radiology changes (continued), ‘Technological revolution’ (continued), EMI’s development of ‘Cat scans’, MRIs, Brain scans, Max Word (again), Rodeo in high school, Medical experience, Lubbock medicine, Managed health care, Cost cutting, Background, Kaiser Medical Care, Cost cutting (again), Expensive equipment, Personal views, Effect on doctor/patient relationship, Involvement of insurance, Government involvement, Political parties, ‘Means test’, Medicare/Medicaid, U. S. medical care compared, Threat to U. S. medicine, Doctor choice, Profits, Nationalized health care, Personalized views, Over-regulation, Insurance companies, ‘Socialist countries’ medicine, Colorado’s Blue Cross system, Pre-Medicare medical society, Government/hospital ‘conspiracy’.

Tape 2, Side 2: Managed health care (continued), Pre-Medicare medical charity (continued), Doctors’ attitudes, New vs. old, Young doctors’ expectations, More control now, Government medical care shortcomings, Dental, Childcare, U. S. compared to other nations, Danger of lawyers, Contingency fee system, Settlements for ‘pain and suffering’, ‘Golden Age of Medicine’, Managed care’s threat, Corrections needed, Women doctors, Minority doctors, Views on race, Minority medical care, Women doctors (again), Advantages/disadvantages, Women/men relationships, Work habits, Child care, Gynecologists, Patient care, Max Word (again), Personal retrospection, Importance of family, Balanced life, Demands of medical career.

Tape 3, Side 1: Max Word (continued), Retrospection (continued), Love for medicine, Dangers of perfection, Flying, Early interest, Missed opportunities, Colorado, Gliders, Hot air ballooning in Africa, Radiology (again), Other nations, Demands for and referrals, Nationalized health care (again), American system best, Private care popular in Europe, Gatekeeper system and rationing, Socialized hospitals, Managed health care, Children—son and daughter, Work in Veterans’ Hospitals, Dreams, Settle ‘town and gown’ problem, Discussion.

Tape 3, Side 2: Max Word (continued), Negative trends in Lubbock area medicine, Mergers, Advertising wastefulness, Corporate medicine, Inefficiency of Texas Tech Medical School, Four campuses, ‘Empire building’, Air emergency inefficient, Over-sophisticated care, Transplants, Personal views, Socialized medicine, Cancer care, HIV treatment, Importance of drug companies to research, Dangerous trends, AIDS activists, Lawsuits negative impact, Relative costs of medicine.

Range Dates: 1929-1998

Bulk Dates: 1972-1990


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