Fenley, Mrs Florence 1970-08-11

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Florence Fenley, West Texas folklore writer, discusses her family history, early settlements near Uvalde, various social aspects of ranch life, and her writing and political careers. On the last tape, Mrs. Fenley plays several musical selections on the piano.

General Interview Information

Interviewee Name: Florence Fenley

Additional Parties Recorded:

Date: August 11, 1970

Location: Uvalde, Texas

Interviewer: Paul Patterson

Length: 2 hours, 30 minutes


Abstract

Tape 1, Side 1: Relates background and anecdotes concerning grandparents, Mention of Lipan and Comanche Indians, Origin of writing career recalled, Discusses grandparents' post-war experiences, Battle at Indian Creek cited, Mexican chase of Apaches, Near Utopia settlement authenticated, Indian Creek battle (continued), Missouri corruption of Spanish place name established, Cites cooperation in establishing settlements, Recollections of sale of buttermilk and grandmother's cooking, Travel routes distinguished, Up-coming book on horses mentioned, Examination of horse behavior, Sheep-raising discussed, Notes origin of Uvalde, Sheep-raising (continued)

Tape 1, Side 2: Comments on marriage of a frontier Negro couple, Grandparents' home remembered, Influence of railroad on Muela settlement, Death of grandparents reviewed, Memories of educational experiences, Present condition of old settlements examined, Recalls West Texas travels and death of husband, Speculates on training for public life, Influence of Mexican guitar on present musical style, Gypsy music described, Memories of Mexican migrants and cowboys, Expresses attitude toward Negro employees, Integrated nature of country school mentioned, Control of anger discussed, Expressions of attitude toward national foreign policy and postal service, Political party views aired along with attitudes toward Vietnam policy, Claims against Mexico for stolen and damaged property reported

Tape 2, Side 1: Commission's work to settle U. S. - Mexican claims explored, Climate and tuberculosis patients discussed, Examines social habits of ranchers, Discussion of Uvalde schools, Response to drought, 1914-1917, First cattle feed of cotton seed cake remembered, Defense of Cattle Association's part in determining Depression, cattle policy, Origin of raising Angora goats near Uvalde related, Expression of attitude toward pioneer settlers, Anecdote about whiskey for medicinal purposes, Cattle drives recalled, Seminole-Negro immigration to Texas cited, Stories about an Indian scout, Recollections of flood details, Screw worm, tick problems recalled, Origin of Texas stock mentioned

Tape 2, Side 2: First experiences in writing career related, Attended Old Timers Reunion of 1939, Review of early West Texas travel, Worked with WPA writing project, Community attitude toward local-color writing expressed, Served term on Texas legislature, Writing career (continued), Specific works cited, Mention of children and their careers, Anecdote about a blind soldier, Speaking before the Texas House, Expression of World War II and post-war experiences, Discussion of writing habits and family responsibilities

Tape 3, Side 1: Waltz played on the piano, Patterson requests a tune, Request granted, More musical selections played, Discussion of friends and acquaintances

Tape 3, Side 2: Blank

Range Dates: 1914-1970

Bulk Dates: 1914-1939


Access Information

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